When Mother is Queen by James R. Coggins

Many women don’t need Mother’s Day. This is because they are treated like royalty all year long. When a woman is treated like a queen, it means that:

  • She is expected to be present at an endless round of athletic events, concerts, award ceremonies, and other occasions in which she has very little interest.
  • She is given an endless array of useless knickknacks and handmade gifts she is expected to cherish and display in a place of honor.
  • She is expected to do her duty, smile graciously, and receive no thanks, just having her position being considered reward enough.
  • She is expected to set a perfect example while enduring in silence the embarrassing indiscretions of her children.
  • She is constantly being criticized for her frumpy clothes and outdated ideas.
  • She is constantly being told that her position is an outdated anachronism.
  • She is constantly bombarded with requests when all she really wants to do is to be left alone in peace.
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About jrcoggins

James R. Coggins is a professional writer and editor based in Abbotsford, British Columbia, Canada. He wrote his first novel in high school, but, fortunately for his later reputation as a writer, it was never published. He briefly served as a Christian magazine editor (for just over 20 years). He has written everything from scholarly and encyclopedia articles to jokes in Reader’s Digest (the jokes paid better). His six and a half published books include four John Smyth murder mysteries and one other, stand-alone novel. In his spare time, he operates Mill Lake Books, a small publishing imprint. His website is www.coggins.ca
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2 Responses to When Mother is Queen by James R. Coggins

  1. Love this post, James. I like your dry sense of humor.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. I never thought of it like that before!! 🙂

    Like

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