Vicki Hinze’s Thoughts on Character Makes a Difference by Mike Huckabee

thoughts on Character Makes a Difference, Mike Huckabee, Vicki HinzeI’ve been reading a book. Mick Huckabee’s book, Character Makes a Difference. 

Let me disclose that I’ve been a political junkie my entire life, but these days, I’m pretty much maxed out on the absence of character evident in politics. Spin is the operative word and I have been wondering lately if most of the people supposedly leading us would recognize the right thing or the truth if it hit them in the head.

 

In other words, I’m weary of the games, the posturing, the diversions, the manipulations. I’ve had it with lies and misstatements put forth to us as inadvertent when they are in fact by design and those speaking them are counting on us, the people they’re supposed to represent, to remain unconscious, disconnected and so sick of it all, we just tune them out and permit them to go on their merry way without comment or interference. In a huge way, that’s what they’ve gotten for years sans periods of brief discourse in reaction to things like the president’s comments last week at the National Prayer Breakfast.

 

My point is that I wasn’t in the most receptive frame of mind to read a book about character written by a politician. But the American in me, the woman in me, needed to read on the topic. I’ve been wallowing in Proverbs, hungry for character and to see it living and breathing and active in lives. I hoped but didn’t count on seeing it living and breathing and active in a life being lived today.

 

So it was at this point that I saw and picked up a copy of this book, Character Makes a Difference, and I warned myself not to expect too much. Politics is a dirty business. It doesn’t have to be, but when the people don’t demand otherwise, that’s where moral decay and the absence of character being required lead us, and that’s what we get.

 

I read, and wasn’t surprised at the events the author faced as Lt. Governor of Arkansas, but I was surprised by his reactions to those events. He didn’t leave God or morals or common sense at the door. No, he brought them with him into office and better yet he kept them front and center while in office.

 

I won’t spoil the book for others, but I will say we have at least one man politically connected who doesn’t attempt to foist rose-colored glasses onto us, to distract us so he can push a hidden agenda. Who speaks plainly about what is and isn’t right, and why, and what he can and cannot or will not do. His moral compass appears intact.

 

Perhaps it’s that he’s a former pastor. Perhaps it was the way he was raised. Perhaps it’s that he’s made past mistakes and suffered the consequences of them and decided he doesn’t want to go there again. I suspect it’s all of that and more that makes him face his job and life morally grounded.

How refreshing it was to read commentary by a man who doesn’t think responsibility is a coat you can put on or take off when it’s convenient.  That it’s a coat we all must wear all the time.

 

There are some welcome quotes in this book. At least, welcome to me, as a reader. Here are a few I highlighted:

 

“Loving others is not the same as performing according to the demands of others.”

 

“True love must draw the line and say ‘no.’”

 

“Without able and honorable competition, victory in any endeavor is meaningless.”

 

“Loving our enemies does not mean giving in to their demands or compromising our values.”

 

As I look through the book, I’ve highlighted a lot. And I hope you will, too.

 

There’s a lot worth reading here. A lot worth being reminded of about the type of conduct we should expect in those we elect to represent us. And a lot to remind us of what we’re missing because we aren’t.

 

Perfect? Absolutely not. Like the rest of us, flawed to the core. But this book is about character, and that is one thing in short supply in too many and the one thing we most sorely need for a civil, constructive and productive society.

 

Character isn’t seated in relativism, this book says. It makes a strong argument, and that makes it worth reading.

 

____________________________

 

Vicki Hinze, My Imperfect Valentine, New Adult novels, Valentine's romance novels© 2014, Vicki Hinze. Hinze is the award-winning, USA Today bestselling author of nearly thirty novels in a variety of genres including, suspense, mystery, thriller, and romantic or faith-affirming thrillers. Her latest release is My Imperfect Valentine. She holds a MFA in Creative Writing and a Ph.D. in Philosophy, Theocentric Business and Ethics. Hinze’s online community: Facebook. Books. Twitter. Contact. www.vickihinze.com.   Subscribe to Vicki’s Newsletter.

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About Vicki Hinze

USA Today Bestselling and Award-Winning Author of 40+ books, short stories/novellas and hundreds of articles. Published in as many as 63 countries. Featured Columnist for Social-IN Worldwide Network and Book Fun Magazine. Sponsor/Founder of ChristiansRead.com & CleanReadBooks.com. FMI visit www.vickihinze.com.
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3 Responses to Vicki Hinze’s Thoughts on Character Makes a Difference by Mike Huckabee

  1. Maureen Lang says:

    Sounds like a great book to read, Vicki! Thanks for the recommendation – those quotes alone piqued my interest, but I loved your take on how character is so sadly lacking in politics. It’s probably true that power has been corrupting people since – well, forever – but these days it just seems so much more apparent. And yet the same people get elected over and over again! I once saw a list that charted how many people in congress were in some kind of legal trouble (from tax issues to drunk driving, among other things) and it was astounding.

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  2. Vicki you described exactly the way it is. Minds and spirits numb from disillusionment. There is a machine that’s keeping people with a destructive agenda in power, and I’m not sure any amount of character can combat it. Yet we have to hope, have to trust. It’s in God’s hands and even if we can’t change the course, God can accomplish his purpose.

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  3. juliearduini says:

    I consider myself an armchair political commentator and I’ve admired Governor Huckabee for a long time for the very reasons you shared. I’d love to see a Huckabee/Carson ticket. I know mere man isn’t the answer, but to have men who love the Lord first and take that to their everyday decisions, our country is crying out for such a thing.

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