Sharing Our Stories by Lynette Sowell

2013-07-28 21.26.44-1We made a very important and momentous trip a little more than one week ago. No fanfare and media frenzy, unlike what happened outside a London hospital not long before. Just a simple trip, three ladies in a bright-red extended-cab pickup truck.

My little granddaughter, two days old, was making a 15-mile journey from the hospital to her home.

Since Grandpa and Daddy were both working that morning, my daughter and I had the honor of taking Little Sugardrop on her very first truck ride, in what we call “Clifford the Big Red Truck.” Clifford has taken on a personality of his own, but that’s another story for another day, perhaps.

Cliffy roared past our city limits sign, and I realized something important: Little Sugardrop had arrived in her hometown for the very first time since being toted around inside her mother’s tummy.

So, like any good grandma, I began telling stories.

We passed the large market where my husband cooks in the cafe’ and my daughter demonstrates recipes and gives samples to customers.

“Look, there’s where Grandpa works, and Mommy, too,” I told her. “Grandpa cooks lots of chickens on the grill for people, and they love his food. Mommy gets to share food and recipes, too. She’s a great cook like Grandpa.” (Why is it we talk to babies as if they understand exactly what we’re telling them?)

We passed a Chinese restaurant. “And there’s where your mommy, daddy, and grandma and grandpa had their last double date before you arrived. We were celebrating because Grandpa passed his course. We were so excited for him.”

Then we passed our credit union. “There’s where we keep our money, and where they know us. I think you’re too little to get a sucker, so we won’t stop there today.”

We passed my son-in-law’s place of work. “There’s where Daddy is right now. He can hardly wait to see you when he gets home. He will give you lots of cuddles and kisses.”

When we’re involved in the life of a child, we have that precious chance of seeing things again for the first time. I’m looking forward to many, many special firsts with Little Sugardrop.

Of opening those pages of well-loved books, the contagious rhymes and life lessons of Dr. Seuss.

Of jumping into well-worn pages, and going through a wardrobe door into the land of Narnia.

Of crossing the plains of Kansas in a covered wagon with Mary and Laura.

Of one day, hearing her little voice read, “’In the beginning, God created the heavens and the earth. And the earth was without form, and void.‘ What does void mean, Grandma?”

Yes, it’s going to be a wonderful time to pass on stories.

I can’t wait to share with her the best ones, and I can’t wait to see which ones she discovers for herself.

– – – – –

Lynette Sowell writes fiction for the inspirational market, from contemporary romance to mysteries. She’s always looking for the perfect recipe for a story–or a great dish–and is always up for a Texas road trip.

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3 Responses to Sharing Our Stories by Lynette Sowell

  1. Ah, brought tears to my eyes, Lynette! Little Sugardrop is blessed to have a thoughtful grandmother like you. After welcoming six grandchildren (six and under) into my life, I now know they can be so full of wit and wisdom. The girls often ask, “Tell me a story, Grandma, about when you were little.” What a wonderful opportunity to pass along family tales along with life lessons learned.

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  2. Carla Gade says:

    How precious it is to talk to our new grandbabies. They do make us open our eyes again to the world around us. Praying many happy story times for you and Little Sugardrop!

    Like

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